Month: October 2016

Secrets of Bonding #135: Surety Bond Challenge Question!

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What kind of surety bond can be written with another bond as it’s subject?

Our articles have covered some of the oddities of the surety world: Seemingly crazy bond forms and rating procedures.  Out of all of them, one is the strangest. An agent colleague called us on one this week, so let’s talk about this ugly baby.

Characteristics:

  • Inexpensive, but hard to get.  Often collateral for more than the bond amount plus full indemnity is required.
  • The bond penalty (dollar amount) may not be fixed.
  • Banks and insurance companies can be both the applicant and beneficiary of such bonds.
  • This bond “renews” for free – for years.
  • It is a surety bond that can have another bond as it’s subject.

Sounds pretty weird? Raise your hand if you know.

It is a Lost Instrument Bond.

So what do these do? No, you don’t get one when you can’t find your tuba.tuba

These bonds are required when an instrument such as a cashier’s check or stock certificate has been lost, and a replacement is desired.  The bond protects the interests of the issuer, and is subject to claim if both the original and the duplicate are cashed.  The bond applicant would be responsible for the financial loss – thus the common need for collateral.

The subject of the surety bond can be a government issued investment bond.  So this is the one surety bond that covers another bond!

Bonding companies are not fond of these because they make a one-time annual premium charge, but the bond must remain in effect for a statutory term, typically years (ugh!)

drummerUnderwriters may refuse to provide a bond immediately after the instrument is lost.  The concern is that the original may be found and the bond returned for a refund.  The surety may require a cooling off period to see if the original is located (90 days?)

Instruments with a changing dollar value, such as shares of stock, are covered with an Open Penalty bond.  This means the dollar value will automatically increase to cover the current value of the instrument, in the event of a claim. This is one more reason to make underwriters reluctant – and require more than 100% of the initial value in collateral.

Lost Instrument Bonds: The ugly babies of the surety world.  So now you know.  They aren’t ugly, they’re just “different!”

(BTW, the author thinks ALL babies are beautiful!)

Secrets of Bonding #134: How to AVOID the T-List

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Need a bond?  Talk to the Pros!  856-304-7348  www.BondingPros.com

Brokers protected.  Contractors welcomed.

cat-hiding-in-snowFamiliar with this?  “T-List” is the bond vernacular for the Treasury List or more formally: Circular 570. The document is produced annually and maintained by the Bureau of Fiscal Service, US Department of Treasury.  Why do some contractors want to avoid it?

Their web page says it is the Treasury’s “Listing of Certified Companies”  https://www.fiscal.treasury.gov/fsreports/ref/suretyBnd/c570_a-z.htm

The purpose of the list is to establish a pool of surety companies that the government finds acceptable to bond federal projects.  Having this group established in advance avoids the need for federal contracting officers to vet the bonding company during each contract award process.  It helps speed things up except for one problem: Not all bonding companies are on the list.

Why is this?  Does it mean they are not strong or ethical?  Does it mean their bonds are no good?  Not necessarily.

Remember, when it comes to corporate sureties, they are subject to state regulation even if they are not on the T-List. So not being on the list could mean:

  • The surety has applied for approval and is still being processed
  • They applied and were declined or deferred to a future date.
  • They have chosen to not apply to be on the list.

Point is – it does necessarily mean anything bad.

For some contractors, they may have a surety relationship in place, but when they go after a federal job, they learn that their surety is not T-Listed.  Must they avoid federal work or find a new surety that is on the approved list?

dog-hiding-in-a-drawerNo…. It turns out there are situations in which the federal government does not require a T-Listed surety.

For construction contracts from $35,000 to $150,000, the government can accept alternative methods of payment protection other than a surety bond. These are:

  • Irrevocable Letter of Credit issued by a commercial bank
  • Tripartite Agreement managed by a federally insured bank
  • Certificate of Deposit
  • Deposit of acceptable securities (Reference F.A.R. section 28.102-1)

For work performed in a foreign country, the bond can be waived entirely if the contracting officer concludes it is impracticable for the contractor to provide a surety bond. (Reference F.A.R. section 28.102-1)

Individual Surety bonds are an alternative to corporate sureties and they are never on the T-List. (Reference F.A.R. section 28.201)

Other forms of security may be used such as

  • United States Bonds or notes
  • Certified or Cashier’s Checks
  • Bank Drafts
  • Money Orders
  • Currency
  • Irrevocable Letter of Credit

Conclusionhiding

Being T-Listed is not always mandatory for federal contracts, although it is in the majority of cases.  Nevertheless, it is interesting to note that there are a series of exceptions, and these are always in play.

Armed with this info, contractors can go after federal work while avoiding the need for a T-Listed surety, or (heaven forbid!) any surety at all.

Insurance Agents and Contractors: When tough bonding situations arise, we have the markets and the know-how to succeed even when others have failed.

Give us a call today!  856-304-7348

Not available in all states including Idaho.