performance bonds

SECRETS OF BONDING #157: Bid Bond Quiz

Is there anything less interesting than a bid bond?

They may not seem too exciting, but the lowly bid bond is an integral part of our surety business.  For contractors, they are often the key to acquiring new revenues.  If you don’t think they are important, watch what happens when a client is waiting for one that never arrives.

As surety underwriters, we spend a great deal of effort assuring these documents are accurate, delivered on time, and we track the outcome on each one.

Everybody knows about bid bonds, right?!  OK let’s see if you do…

True or False:

  1. If you decide to not use a bid bond you ordered, you have to send it back to the surety within 48 hours
  2. They have an expiration date
  3. A bid bond precedes every performance bond
  4. The surety can cancel the bid bond
  5. The dollar value of the bid bond equals the amount of the proposal it accompanies
  6. The surety must know the exact dollar value of the bid bond before they will issue it
  7. The premium for them must be paid in advance
  8. They remain active for up to six months
  9. It is better to use a check for security than a bid bond
  10. The same surety that issues the bid bond must issue the performance bond

OK team, how’d you do?  # of True______? # of False____?

They are all False!

  1. An unused bid bond has no value but it makes a great liner for your bird cage
  2. Never has an expiration date
  3. Some contracts are negotiated (no bid bond) or may require a surety capacity letter instead
  4. Like a performance bond, these surety instruments cannot be cancelled
  5. Most often the penal sum of the bid bond equals a percentage (10-20%) of the proposal amount
  6. Most bid bond amounts are expressed as a percentage of the proposal amount, not a dollar amount, to protect the confidentiality of the proposers bid. In such cases the exact dollar value is unknown in advance.
  7. Sureties are entitled to charge for them, but usually don’t
  8. Although not stated, most sureties consider them void after 90 days
  9. Wrong! If the performance bond is not produced, the check can be forfeited
  10. Nope! Two different sureties can be used, even if a “Consent of Surety” was issued with the bid bond.

Bonus Question: If the bid is rejected because the surety’s credentials are found to be inadequate, can this result in a bid bond claim?

Answer: Theoretically, it should not. If the bond is declared inadequate, how can it be sufficient for a claim?

When flexibility and aggressive underwriting are needed, give us a call. We have in-house authority for Bid and Performance Bonds up to $10 million each, and guarantee a same day response.  Find out what you missing when it comes to surety bonds.  

KIS Surety Bonds, LLC is the exclusive surety underwriting department for Great Midwest Insurance Company an “A – 8” carrier licensed in all states plus D.C.  “steve@kisbonds.com” or call 856-304-7348.

Secrets of Bonding #155: The Double Bonding Conundrum

This is America. Everyone is entitled to their opinion. But on the subject of Double Bonding (Contract Surety) we will not all agree.

So here are the facts. You will decide if this is a great idea or just a waste.

What is Double Bonding?

Also called “back bonding” or “subcontract bonding” an example would be when both a subcontract and a prime (directly with the project owner) construction contract are bonded. The prime contractor is the General Contractor (GC).

The GC gives some of the work to trade contractors such as the plumbing, electrical and HVAC. These firms may be required to give a subcontract bond to the GC guaranteeing their work. In turn, the GC provides a bond that covers everything. In other words, it too covers the plumbing, electrical and HVAC. That’s the “double” part. Sounds pretty dopey so far, right? Why would anybody do that?

Turns out this occurs often. Depending on your viewpoint, it may seem helpful / essential, or just a waste of money. Let’s evaluate it and you decide.

Why Love It:

  • Owner: Subs that have been approved by a surety may perform better.
  • GCs: May have a policy to automatically bond subs over a certain dollar value. This is intended to prevent delays and unpaid bill problems.  In addition, the GC / prime contractor is the direct beneficiary, and the potential claimant against such bonds.
  • Subcontractors: With a surety backing them, they may have an advantage when pursuing new work. These are important credentials that prove they have passed the underwriters scrutiny and have the backing of a professional guarantor.
  • Sureties:  May find it easier to support the GC bond if major subs are bonded. A portion of the risk is then covered by *another bonding company.
  • Third tier subs and material suppliers: May not be protected by a payment bond unless double bonding is in place. The GC’s bond may not go down to the third tier (sub of a sub or third tier suppliers.)
  • The most important reason: It is possible that the GC’s surety may insist that major subs be bonded as a condition of supporting the GC. This can be the key to acquiring the contract.

Why Hate It:

  • Owner: Doesn’t need sub bonds because the GC’s bond already covers all the work.  They may be forced to bear the related premium costs if the sub bonds were anticipated. If they were not, the charges may come out of the GC’s profits.
  • GC: In a competitive situation, the related costs could cause them to lose the project. Sub bonds may help GC with their surety, but they do not reduce the cost or dollar value of the GC’s bond.

Bonus Conundrum

Love it or hate it, double bonding is sometimes done voluntarily, or it may be stipulated by the GC’s surety. There is no denying that the concept is important – so important that in some cases both the GC bond and the sub bonds are written by the *same surety. Why would they do that?!

~ ~ ~

KIS Surety Bonds, LLC is the exclusive underwriting department for Great Midwest Insurance Company an “A – 8” carrier licensed in all states plus D.C.

We have in-house authority for Bid and Performance Bonds up to $10 million each.

Contact us for creative solutions and a same day response: 856-304-7348.

Flat Tires and Surety Bonds

“It’s only flat on the bottom!”  When you heard that, did it make you feel any better?  No… a flat tire is a real PIA. Nothin’ good about it!

What about “Flat line?”  Heaven forbid!  That’s real bad.

When I was a kid we had an expression, a “Flat leaver.”  That was a person who left you flat. Don’t like that either.

You can probably think of other examples: Flat footed, flat broke, flat on your back…

BUT! When it comes to surety bonds, flat can be good. Look at how major sureties typically make their decisions.  There is the field person in the branch, plus a supervisor, and a bond manager.  Then there is a home office underwriter, maybe two.  Together this “committee” makes major decisions.  Problem is, they don’t actually work as a committee, they process the decision sequentially.  Each person looks at it, then sends it on to the next.  That’s a great system, unless you need an answer in this lifetime!

This is an example of a decision making structure that is not flat.  It is multi-layer, multi-person, each with an “in” box and other priorities.  Getting a decision will take a couple of weeks.

When it comes to surety bonds, you want flat.  You want a structure where decisions are made promptly and efficiently.  Then everyone wins.  You get the answer you need, when you need it.  Isn’t this how the system is supposed to work?

KIS Surety / Great Midwest Insurance Company (GMIC) is your large capacity, most flat market.  We process decisions fast.  All new submissions receive a same day response.  Productive, creative, expert underwriting that has produced superb results for years.

Do yourself a favor.  Take a step up to surety bonds the way they should be. KIS Surety Bonds, LLC is the exclusive underwriting department for Great Midwest Insurance Company an “A – 8” carrier licensed in all states plus D.C.  We have in-house authority for Bid and Performance Bonds up to $10 million each.

Contact us for creative solutions and a same day response: 856-304-7348

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Secrets of Bonding #153: The Last Hurrah!

 

Birth and death.

Ebb and flow.

The world has a natural rhythm that affects all things, including the surety business.

So here it is, The Last Hurrah. We always knew it would come someday, and now it’s here. It is the annual cycle we experience in the world of Bonding.  The final big event of the year is approaching after which it’s all holidays, gift shopping, family visits, food and not too much business getting done.

The big day is just a couple of weeks off: September 30th.  It is the last day of the federal government’s fiscal year.

For government contracting officers, this day means “use it or lose it.” Federal funds that have been earmarked for certain projects must be used by 9/30, or the funds (heaven forbid!) go back to the treasury department.  Every year this results in a rush of contract awards on or about 9/30.  Some of our clients have received contract awards as late as 11:45 pm on the night of September 30. Crazy!

How does all this affect YOU? It could mean there will be an urgent need for performance bonds. There is always a deadline by which they must be filed.  Contractors and their surety agents must be prepared to respond.

Enter Great Midwest Insurance Company (part of Houston International Insurance Group.) We are an A-8 rated carrier (A.M. Best), licensed in all states and D.C.  Our surety department specializes in Bid and Performance Bonds for contractors.  This year we can help by providing Subcontract Bonds on federal projects. We support a wide range of construction trades, and a variety of underwriting situations with bonds up to $10 million each.

Don’t be depressed about the Last Hurrah.  It can be a great end to a successful year and besides, you’ll get another one next year!

KIS Surety Bonds, LLC is the exclusive underwriting department for Great Midwest Insurance Company.  Contact us for creative solutions and A-rated bonds.  Our underwriting experts guarantee a same day response.

For bonds from Great Midwest Insurance Company call: 856-304-7348.

Secrets of Bonding #151: It’s Time For…Timing!

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Need a bond?  Talk to the Pros!  856-304-7348  www.BondingPros.com

Brokers protected.  Contractors welcomed.

With Surety Bonds, Timing can be critically important.  There are certain things that must happen first.  You can’t get them out of order. Here are some examples.  Do you know which comes first, and why?

Cover the answers with a piece of paper as you scroll down. (Paper is white stuff people used to write on. Really!)

  1. Bid Bond / Performance Bond
    • OK that was an easy one. They get harder. Bid bonds always come first – if there is one.  Not all performance bonds are preceded by a bid bond. Negotiated projects would be an example.
  2. Bond execution / Indemnity Agreement execution
    • The Indemnity always comes before the bond. It is the promise to pay back the surety in the event of a claim / loss. Sureties want this protection in place before they assume any risk.
  3. Surety Consent to Final Payment / Obligee Status Inquiry Form
    • The Status Inquiry form comes first. It is the obligees statement that the work is acceptable.  The surety requires to see this before agreeing to release the final payment.  If there are unresolved issues, the contractor must address them before the last contract funds come over. (That’s true motivation!)
  4. Payment Bond Release (exoneration) / End of Lien Period
    • Since the bond guarantees the payments that may be owed during the lien period, the time for liens must end before the bond is concluded.
  5. Contract Acceptance / Maintenance Bond Issuance
    • Sureties want the contract accepted first and the P&P bond released before assuming the risk associated with a Maintenance bond. Some obligees require issuance of the maintenance bond simultaneously with the P&P bond at the start of the project, but underwriters resist this.
  6. Bid Results / P&P Bond Issuance
    • Underwriters want to evaluate the adequacy of the contract price prior to bond issuance. They do this by evaluating the bid results, comparing the various proposals from different companies.  In some cases, the bid results are not published, in which case they have wing it!
  7. P&P Bond for Started Project / All Right Letter
    • The All Right letter is the obligee’s assurance that there is not already a problem on the contract that will result in an immediate bond claim. Sureties require a clean bill of health before bonding a started project (unless the degree of completion is very low i.e. 5%).
  8. Award Letter / Notice to Proceed
    • Award letter comes first, then the contract signing and Notice to Proceed is issued. Then “Grab ya hamma!”
  9. Tough Bond Problem / Call Bonding Pros!  856-304-7348
    • You can call us for discussion or general info any time. However, when a tough bond problem arises, that’s your cue to call in the experts.  Getting with us is as easy as making that call.  We have the markets and the expertise.  Bonds are all we do – since 1972!

Insurance Agents and Contractors: Love the “Secrets” articles? You’ll really love it when we solve your tough bonding problem! We have the markets and the know-how to succeed even when others have failed.  Call us with your next surety bond need.  We guarantee a same day response.  856-304-7348

Not available in all states.

Secrets of Bonding #148: The Greatest Impediment to Bonding

Brought to you by…Secrets of Bonding is brought to you by Bonding Pros

Need a bond?  Talk to the Pros!  856-304-7348  www.BondingPros.com

Brokers protected.  Contractors welcomed.

Surety bonds are hard to get. Contractors and their insurance agents know that underwriters are conservative. They ask lots of questions. Then they ask more questions. Then they say they can’t help you. It’s a fun-filled process.

Some contractors can’t get bonded because they have a poor credit history. Others have weak or insufficient financial statements. There are plenty of reasons for an unhappy ending, but what is the single biggest reason – and what can you do about it?

Crappy credit: This is a very common problem. The company may be struggling to get enough work, resulting in a weak credit report. So they decide to move into public work for additional revenues – but the bad credit report makes this impossible. Sometimes the report can be improved by correcting errors and updating the info. This is not the greatest impediment contractors and their agents face.

Weak or insufficient financial statement: There are innumerable potential problems. No financial statement, only an internal statement, only a compilation, an interim FS, a net loss, no working capital – the pitfalls are endless! It’s not the biggest impediment though.

Unsavory circumstances: Excessive bid spreads, inadequate prior experience, bad bond forms, harsh contract terms, too much other work. They are all bad, but they are not the king.

The Greatest Impediment

Picture how the process starts. When the contractor decides to go after bonding, a list of information is requested. The underwriter wants business and personal financial statements. A current work in process schedule is needed. Prior tax returns, resumes of key people and a bank reference letter are desired.

The contractor wants to pursue this, but MAN, that’s a lot of stuff!

He has not needed to make company financial statements, so how to come up with them now?

The company owner never needed to make a resume, always been self-employed. How do I write that up?

The WIP schedule: I don’t have that info available. I know where I am on all my jobs. Why would I take the time to fill out a bunch of forms anyway?

I can get the bank reference letter completed and make copies of prior tax returns (they want the WHOLE THING?!) But if I do that, who’s gonna do the estimating so we don’t run out of work? And I have to visit the projects or everything will grind to a halt. The workers want to milk every job like it’s their last. They’ll suck the profits out of everything if I give them the chance.

Conclusion 

The greatest impediment is the applicant themselves! In my 40+ years of surety bond underwriting, I have concluded that MOST contractors deserve to be bonded, but many fail to acquire surety support. It is because they stop trying, or never really start.

People must make choices. They have to put bread on the table. If they can succeed by doing what they know, why try some experiment that may fail? Sometimes it’s just easier to keep doing the same thing – even if you are discontent.

Our observation is that bonding takes perseverance and patience. It is a journey, a path with unexpected twists. There can be obstacles, but we have solutions! If contractors or agents expect it to be fast and easy… they may be disappointed.

Applicants for bonding must plan to devote some time and energy to achieve a goal they know is worthy. It says a lot to have a surety backing you. They are vouching for your ability, and putting up their own money to prove it. It’s a big deal and not always easy, but always worth it in the end.

Insurance Agents and Contractors: Love the “Secrets” articles? You’ll really love it when we solve your tough bonding problem! We have the markets and the know-how to succeed even when others have failed.  Call us with your next surety bond need.  We guarantee a same day response.  856-304-7348

Not available in all states.

Secrets of Bonding #147: Surety Challenge Question “If It Quacks Like a Duck…”

Brought to you by…Secrets of Bonding is brought to you by Bonding Pros

Need a bond?  Talk to the Pros!  856-304-7348  www.BondingPros.com

Brokers protected.  Contractors welcomed.

Up for a challenge?  Here is the scenario:

A Performance and Payment Bond has been approved on a project. The lender (funding the contract) is requiring it.

There is a discussion regarding the procedures that will be used to control disbursement of the contract funds – they are extensive.

A licensed architect is being used and they will oversee the processing of each monthly payment to the contractor.  To protect the lenders interests, they will not only review the paperwork that is submitted (called a Pay Requisition), they will also conduct a physical inspection of the site.  The point of this is to assure that the contractor is only paid for work actually in place.

If approved by the architect, the pay requisition then goes to the lender for their review and handling.  Finally, the money is paid to the general contractor (GC) who then pays subcontractors and suppliers.

The GC has additional controls in place.  They monitor the status of all their subcontractors and suppliers.  Each month lien releases are obtained which is a guarantee that all the people downstream are being properly paid.  This step prevents future claims against the contractor, project owner or surety for non-payment.

Everything is checked and double checked. Each month these controls assure that the funds are handled properly. 

So here is the Surety Challenge Question:

The bond underwriter has required “Funds Control” as a condition of the bond approval. Do the multiple procedures we described satisfy this requirement?  If it quacks like a duck, is it a duck?

Answer: No!

It seems hard to believe, because no one would deny those controls are all good – and highly beneficial. But actually there is a missing piece we must add to have true “funds control.” It comes at the end of the money handling, the disbursement.

From a surety viewpoint, the funds administrator must be the Paymaster for the contract. It pays everyone, including the general contractor.  The problem with our example scenario is that the GC is paying all the subs and suppliers.  This is just what the surety does not want.

True “funds control” aka “funds administration” gives the underwriter confidence that the money will stay in the project and not get diverted to the contractor’s other work.  It also prevents claims against the Payment Bond by assuring that suppliers of labor and material are paid properly and timely.

Funds Control is a specialized process conducted by a party separate from the surety company. When utilized, applicants must be prepared to pay an additional fee for these “back room” services, and follow the required procedures for prompt money handling each month.

Learn the difference between Funds Control and Tripartite Agreements: Click!

Insurance Agents and Contractors: Love the “Secrets” articles? You’ll really love it when we solve your tough bonding problem! We have the markets and the know-how to succeed even when others have failed.  Call us with your next surety bond need.  We guarantee a same day response.  856-304-7348

Not available in all states.